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JoLS, Journal of Life Sciences, a Postdoc Community Initiative
Nimrat Chatterjee, and Theo van den Broek
Road to HIV cure; from Berlin to London and beyond
Theo van den Broek
Immune Control of HIV
Muthukumar Balasubramaniam, Jui Pandhare, and Chandravanu Dash
Capsid-CPSF6 interaction: Master regulator of nuclear HIV-1 positioning and integration
Vasudevan Achuthan, Jill M. Perreira, Jenny J. Ahn, Abraham L. Brass, Alan N. Engelman
Immunotherapy for hematological malignancies
Shuai Dong, and Irene M Ghobrial
How daily habits help you deal with stress
D. van Lith

Author(s)
Nimrat Chatterjee, and Theo van den Broek

Institute
MIT, Boston's Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School
Address
MIT, Cambridge Massachusetts, Boston Children's Hospital/HMS, Boston, Massachusetts, MA, USA
Abstract:

With great pleasure we welcome you to the first issue of the Journal of Life Sciences (JoLS), a postdoc community initiative. With the generation of this new journal, JoLS has set two major goals. First, the publication of professional peer-reviewed open access international journal within life science. Second, to support the post-doc community by providing an opportunity in gaining experience in reviewing and editing manuscripts and highlighting their research and activities.


Author(s)
Theo van den Broek

Institute
Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Address
Department of Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine PCMM, 200 Longwood Ave, Boston,MA 02115. USA
Abstract:

Around 37 million people are living with HIV worldwide, with a million deaths due to HIV in 2017. While only '60% of the infected population are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), by taking a combination of drugs suppressing different stage of the HIV lifecycle to lower the viral burden. While the treatment is very effective it does not eliminate HIV from the patient’s body and non-AIDS comorbidities (cardiovascular diseases and cancers) and unrelenting rate of new infections (around 2 million infections per year) have become a major concern and, thus new approaches are needed that no longer continuously suppress HIV but actually cure people.


Author(s)
Muthukumar Balasubramaniam, Jui Pandhare, and Chandravanu Dash

Institute
Meharry Medical College
Address
Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN – 37208. USA.
Abstract:

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the immune cells expressing the cluster of differentiation 4 cell surface glycoprotein (CD4+ cells) causes progressive decline of the immune system and leads to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The ongoing global HIV/AIDS pandemic has already claimed over 35 million lives. Even after 37 years into the epidemic, neither a cure is available for the 37 million people living with HIV (PLHIV) nor is a vaccine discovered to avert the millions of new HIV infections that continue to occur each year. If left untreated, HIV infection typically progresses to AIDS and, ultimately, causes death in a majority of PLHIV. The recommended combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppresses virus replication and viremia, prevents or delays progression to AIDS, reduces transmission rates, and lowers HIV-associated mortality and morbidity. However, because cART does not eliminate HIV, and an enduring pool of infected resting memory CD4+ T cells (latent HIV reservoir) is established early on, any interruption to cART leads to a relapse of viremia and disease progression. Hence, strict adherence to a life-long cART regimen is mandatory for managing HIV infection in PLHIV. The HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells expressing the CD8 glycoprotein (CD8+ CTL) limit the virus replication in vivo by recognizing the viral antigens presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on the infected cell surface and killing those cells. Nevertheless, .....


Author(s)
Vasudevan Achuthan, Jill M. Perreira, Jenny J. Ahn, Abraham L. Brass, Alan N. Engelman

Institute
DFCI, Harvard Medical School, U Mass Medical School.
Abstract:

HIV-1 integration favors active chromatin, which is primarily mediated through interactions between the viral capsid and integrase proteins with host factors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75, respectively. Previously published image-based studies had suggested that HIV-1 prefers to integrate into chromatin that associates spatially with the nuclear periphery. Here, we re-evaluated previously reported HIV-1 nuclear distance measures across studies and show that HIV-1 prefers peri-nuclear and mid-nuclear zones similarly, with a common preference between studies mapping to the boundary between these two radial areas. We also discuss emerging roles for the capsid-CPSF6 interaction in facilitating HIV-1 pre-integration complex nuclear import and subsequent intranuclear trafficking to preferred sites of viral DNA integration.


Author(s)
Shuai Dong, and Irene M Ghobrial

Institute
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Institute of Mecicine
Address

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

Harvard Institute of Medicine Room 237, 4 BlackfanCircle, Boston MA 02115


Abstract:

Tumor immune tolerance remains a major barrier for effective anti-cancer therapy. A growing number of pathways whereby solid tumors escape immune surveillance have been characterized. This progress led us to revisit the “hallmarks of cancer” and brought forward many promising immunotherapies. Every growing bodies of research have brought forward many exciting treatment strategies for hematological cancers like chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T cells) and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Given the distinct characteristics of the different cancers, some benefited profoundly from such therapies while some remain challenging for scientists and physicians. Here, we discuss the unique aspect of hematological malignancies, and briefly review the history, existing and future of immunotherapies for this group of cancer.

 
 
     
 
 
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