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Epigenetic Regulation of Cardiac Development and Disease through DNA Methylation
Yahui Lan and Todd Evans
Kinases: The "Indispensables"of the DNA Damage Response Cascade
Vijay Menon and M. Michael Dcona
JoLS, Journal of Life Sciences, a Postdoc Community Initiative
Nimrat Chatterjee, and Theo van den Broek
Road to HIV cure; from Berlin to London and beyond
Theo van den Broek
Immune Control of HIV
Muthukumar Balasubramaniam, Jui Pandhare, and Chandravanu Dash
Capsid-CPSF6 interaction: Master regulator of nuclear HIV-1 positioning and integration
Vasudevan Achuthan, Jill M. Perreira, Jenny J. Ahn, Abraham L. Brass, Alan N. Engelman
Immunotherapy for hematological malignancies
Shuai Dong, and Irene M Ghobrial
How daily habits help you deal with stress
D. van Lith

Author(s)
Yahui Lan and Todd Evans

Institute
Weill Cornell Medical College
Abstract:

Epigenetic  control  mechanisms play critical roles in organ development and tissue homeostasis. Increasing evidence suggests that cardiac lineage commitment and  cardiovascular disease  are tightly regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, controlling changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and expression levels for non-coding RNAs. This review summarizes our current understanding of epigenetic control mechanisms regulating cardiac development and  disease , particularly focuses on the function of DNA methylation and demethylation through families of DNA methyltransferases and dioxygenases.


Author(s)
Vijay Menon and M. Michael Dcona

Institute
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Virginia Commonwealth University
Abstract:

The human genome is exposed to a gamut of cellular and exogenous insults on a daily basis which needs to be monitored for proper cellular functioning and survival. This surveillance is undertaken by a myriad of protein players that ensure temporal and spatial regulation of cellular homeostasis. Kinases lie at the epicenter of the DNA damage response and exhibit a dynamic functionality, from responding to the damage to regulating the role of other proteins involved in detecting and repairing the damage. Here, we review some of the key kinases involved in DNA damage response pathways and their inhibitors that are either inclinical trials or have received approval for disease treatment.


Author(s)
Nimrat Chatterjee, and Theo van den Broek

Institute
MIT, Boston's Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School
Address
MIT, Cambridge Massachusetts, Boston Children's Hospital/HMS, Boston, Massachusetts, MA, USA
Abstract:

With great pleasure we welcome you to the first issue of the Journal of Life Sciences (JoLS), a postdoc community initiative. With the generation of this new journal, JoLS has set two major goals. First, the publication of professional peer-reviewed open access international journal within life science. Second, to support the post-doc community by providing an opportunity in gaining experience in reviewing and editing manuscripts and highlighting their research and activities.


Author(s)
Theo van den Broek

Institute
Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Address
Department of Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine PCMM, 200 Longwood Ave, Boston,MA 02115. USA
Abstract:

Around 37 million people are living with HIV worldwide, with a million deaths due to HIV in 2017. While only '60% of the infected population are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), by taking a combination of drugs suppressing different stage of the HIV lifecycle to lower the viral burden. While the treatment is very effective it does not eliminate HIV from the patient’s body and non-AIDS comorbidities (cardiovascular diseases and cancers) and unrelenting rate of new infections (around 2 million infections per year) have become a major concern and, thus new approaches are needed that no longer continuously suppress HIV but actually cure people.


Author(s)
Muthukumar Balasubramaniam, Jui Pandhare, and Chandravanu Dash

Institute
Meharry Medical College
Address
Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN – 37208. USA.
Abstract:

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the immune cells expressing the cluster of differentiation 4 cell surface glycoprotein (CD4+ cells) causes progressive decline of the immune system and leads to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The ongoing global HIV/AIDS pandemic has already claimed over 35 million lives. Even after 37 years into the epidemic, neither a cure is available for the 37 million people living with HIV (PLHIV) nor is a vaccine discovered to avert the millions of new HIV infections that continue to occur each year. If left untreated, HIV infection typically progresses to AIDS and, ultimately, causes death in a majority of PLHIV. The recommended combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppresses virus replication and viremia, prevents or delays progression to AIDS, reduces transmission rates, and lowers HIV-associated mortality and morbidity. However, because cART does not eliminate HIV, and an enduring pool of infected resting memory CD4+ T cells (latent HIV reservoir) is established early on, any interruption to cART leads to a relapse of viremia and disease progression. Hence, strict adherence to a life-long cART regimen is mandatory for managing HIV infection in PLHIV. The HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells expressing the CD8 glycoprotein (CD8+ CTL) limit the virus replication in vivo by recognizing the viral antigens presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on the infected cell surface and killing those cells. Nevertheless, .....

 
 
     
 
 
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